Skip to main content

Qualified Adults

 

PREGNANT WOMEN

Influenza can be very serious during pregnancy. If you are pregnant, you should have a flu vaccine to help protect you and your unborn child. Flu vaccine is safe at all stages of pregnancy.

If a pregnant woman has flu, her baby is more likely to be born prematurely, have low birth weight, or be stillborn or die within their first week. The vaccine also helps protect the baby during the first 4-6 months of life when flu can be very serious.

You should have the flu vaccine as soon as you know you are pregnant (if the vaccine is available); you can get it at the same time as the cough vaccine, but don't delay your flu vaccine simply so you can have both at the same time.

Pregnant women can get their flu vaccine at their GP Surgery or hospital, depending on individual care circumstances. The vaccine is delivered as an injection.


PEOPLE WITH LONG TERM HEALTH CONDITION

If you have been told you are in the group of people needing shelter during the COVID-19 pandemic it is extremely important that you get your flu vaccine this year.

If any of the following apply to you, you are at greater risk of complications from the flu even if you feel well, and it is important that you have a flu vaccine:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart problem
  • Chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including asthma requiring regular steroid inhalers or tablets
  • Kidney disease (from stage 3)
  • Lower immunity due to disease or treatment
  • Liver disease
  • Had a stroke or minor stroke
  • A neurological condition
  • Problem with your spleen
  • Higher body fat (Body Mass Index of 40 or higher - aged over 16)
  • Lower immunity due to disease or treatment (and close contacts with people in this group too)
  • People with a learning disability

Adults in these groups can get their flu vaccine mainly from a GP or alternatively at your community pharmacy. The mode of delivery depends on age.


PEOPLE 50 OR OVER

If you are 50 or over you are at greater risk of complications from flu than other people and can also exacerbate any existing health condition.

People in this age group (aged 50 or over on March 31 2022) can get their flu vaccine at their GP surgery, or through a community pharmacy. The method of distribution is by injection.


CARERS

If you are the main unpaid carer of someone whose health or welfare would be at risk if you caught the flu then you should have an annual flu vaccination.

People in this group can get their flu vaccine at their GP surgery, or through a community pharmacy.


NHS SHIELDED GROUP AND THEIR HOUSING LINKS

If you have been told you are in the group of people needing shelter during the COVID-19 pandemic it is extremely important that you receive your flu vaccine this year.

In addition, the home contacts of those who have been shadowing are also eligible for a free flu vaccine this year - it is essential for this group to have a vaccine to protect those they live with.

These groups can get a flu vaccine from their GP practice or community pharmacy. Distribution method depending on age.